Puppies

daughterpuppiessmallBreeding British Field Labs

Prior to any breeding, I evaluate each dog for their strengths and their weaknesses.  With any pairing, to the best of my ability, I match strengths-to-strengths.  I will not make a pairing that matches a weakness-to-a-weakness.  I believe such a pairing increases the potential to diminish instinct, ability, and willingness to please.

Current Litters – As of July 10, 2017

Georgie x Tupelo       Whelped: May 30, 2017

                                       1 Yellow Male AVAILABLE

Annie x George           Whelped:  July 1, 2017

                                        1 Yellow Male, 1 Yellow Female AVAILABLE                         

Upcoming Litters

Georgie x Undetermined       Breeding:  April 2018

Louisa x Undetermined         Breeding:  May 2018

Both litters will have both black and yellow pups.

Important Characteristics for any Breeding

Beth and I believe that to create a dog that continues the great reputation of the British Field Lab, certain characteristics must be present in the pairing.

  • The pairing are passionate hunters with strong retrieval instincts.
  • The pairing is pleasing to the eye and free of genetic deficiencies. (eyes and hips)
  • The pairing is quiet and low maintenance to live with.
  • The pairing has strong interest in pleasing humans.
  • The pairing has obvious intelligence and learns quickly.

Planning for Pups         

Beth and I firmly believe that at least 5 puppies from each litter need to be pre-sold to their birth.  This ensures that the puppies will have early contact with their owners and will also be guaranteed a home.

Currently, litters and the mother are housed in our downstairs family room.  This allows for careful monitoring of very young puppies.  (It also allows us the pleasure of watching the comical puppy antics.)

Early socialization is very important for a dog’s confidence and demeanor.  Our daughter, Anna, (and even our granddaughter, Flannery) helps with socialization:  taking the pups for walks, holding them on the couch, and simply getting down on the floor with them.  We all participate in the feeding, cleaning, and care of the pups and believe this helps the pups to acclimate themselves to people.

Depending on the season, we also believe in fresh air.  We set each litter outside for a few hours a day to investigate the grass and bugs in the backyard.  On occasion, a pup has been brave enough to find the ditch.

We welcome visits from puppy buyers after the 3rd week.  We believe this is a beautiful start for great hunting companions (and new family members).  The more time spent getting to know your puppy, the better you will handle it and the better it will respond to you.  By the time the puppy is sent home with you, it should feel like it has known you for awhile.